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Travelling with a firearm following Brexit

From 1 January 2021, British residents (excluding Northern Ireland) will no longer be able to use a European Firearms Pass.

European Firearms Passes issued prior to the end of the transition period on 31 December 2020 from persons in Northern Ireland remain valid.

 

What this means:

Irish firearm holders

Firearm holders resident in Ireland seeking to travel to Britain or Northern Ireland should consult the appropriate authority for the appropriate authorisation.

The UK Government has issued a guidance document

 

Visiting shooters resident in Great Britain and Northern Ireland

British and Northern Irish visitors seeking to shoot in Ireland should continue to apply to An Garda Síochána for a Non-Resident Firearm Certificate. The application should be made to the Superintendent of the Garda district where the applicant first wishes to shoot.

Firearm Certificate Application form

As part of the application process, and in the absence of a European Firearms Pass, British visitors may submit a firearm permit, licence, authorisation or other document issued by an appropriate authority that is acceptable to the issuing Garda officer. Northern Ireland residents should continue to submit a valid European Firearms Pass issued prior to the end of the transition period.

 

Licenced firearm holders transiting through the Republic of Ireland

Licenced firearm holders from Britain and Northern Ireland transiting through Ireland can apply to the Department of Justice. In the absence of a European Firearms Pass, British visitors may submit a firearm permit, licence, authorisation or other document by an appropriate authority that is acceptable to the issuing officer. 

Application for a Licence to Transit The State with Firearms

Northern Ireland residents should continue to submit a valid European Firearms Pass issued prior to the end of the transition period.


Import and export of a firearm following Brexit

From 1 January 2021, the United Kingdom (excluding Northern Ireland) will be considered a ‘Third Country’ for the purposes of trade in firearms and ammunition.

The EU Firearms Directive 91/477/EEC is the relevant EU legislation in respect of trade in firearms and ammunition.

 

What this means:

Export of Firearms and Ammunition

The export licensing function for firearms and ammunition exported to the United Kingdom (excluding Northern Ireland) will transfer from the Department of Justice to the Department of Enterprise, Trade and Employment with effect from 1 January 2021.

Further information on the Department of Enterprise, Trade and Employment licensing process is available on their website: Procedures for applying for an Export Licence

 

Import of Firearms and Ammunition

Firearms and ammunition imported from the UK will continue to require an import application issued by the Department of Justice. There is no significant change expected to this process.

Firearms and all essential components of a firearm imported from the UK must be marked in accordance with the EU Firearms Directive.

Firearms that are imported from other EU Member States and that transit via the UK to Ireland may be subject to additional checks by the UK authorities. Registered Firearms Dealers are advised to consult UK authorities in this regard.

The UK Government have issued guidance in respect of exports from the UK: Exporting controlled goods from 1 January 2021


Explosives for civil uses after Brexit

The European Union (EU) Commission has published information which outlines the main implications for economic operators in the field of explosives for civil use at the end of the transition period on 31 December 2020.

Withdrawal of the United Kingdom and EU Rules In The Field Of Explosives For Civil Use And Explosives Precursors

The main consequences are outlined below.

 

Consequences for the Identification of Economic Operators

Manufacturers or importers established in the UK, excluding Northern Ireland, will no longer be considered as economic operators established in the EU. Consequently an economic operator established in the EU, including Northern Ireland, who previously was considered as an EU distributor will become an importer for the purposes of Directive 2014/28/EU in relation to explosives for civil uses received from a third country which it places on the EU market. The specific obligations for importers are detailed in Directive 2014/28/EU and include the requirement to label the explosives for civil uses with the information about the importer.

 

Marking of Explosives for Civil Use

After the end of the transition period, manufacturing sites in the UK, excluding Northern Ireland, will be identified as located outside the EU and will require a code to be attributed by the national authority of the EU Member State of import. In this case the importer is to contact the Member State of import in order for the manufacturing site to be attributed a code.

 

Transfers of Explosives for Civil Use

After the end of the transition period on 31 December 2020, a shipment of explosives for civil uses to, from and through the UK, excluding Northern Ireland, is no longer an intra-EU transfer. Shipments of explosives for civil uses to and from Northern Ireland are still an intra-EU transfer.

 

Placing on the Market

Explosives for civil uses which have been placed on the market in the EU or the UK prior to the end of the transition period may be further made available on the EU market until it reaches its end-user.


Pyrotechnics after Brexit

The EU Commission has published an information which outlines the main implications related to pyrotechnic articles from the end of the transition period on 31 December 2020.

Withdrawal of the United Kingdom And EU Rules In The Field Of Pyrotechnic Articles

 

Pyrotechnic articles are described as any article containing explosive substances or an explosive mixture of substances designed to produce heat, light, sound, gas or smoke or a combination of such effects through self-sustained exothermic chemical reactions.

The main consequences are outlined below.

 

Consequences for the Identification of Economic Operators

Manufacturers or importers established in the UK, excluding Northern Ireland, will no longer be considered as economic operators established in the EU. Consequently an economic operator established in the EU, including Northern Ireland, who previously was considered as an EU distributor will become an importer for the purposes of Directive 2013/29/EU in relation to pyrotechnic articles received from a third country which it places on the EU market. The specific obligations for importers are detailed in Directive 2013/29/EU and include the requirement to label the pyrotechnic articles with the information about the importer.

 

Placing on the Market

Pyrotechnic articles which have been placed on the market in the EU or the UK prior to the end of the transition period may be further made available on the EU market until it reaches its end user.