Consultation on Seasonal Clock Changes opens from 26 October 2018

 

Clocks are changed twice each year in order to cater for the changing patterns of daylight and to match the hours of available daylight to people’s daily activities.

 Seasonal_Clock_Changes

EU legislation on summer time was first introduced in 1980, with the objective of ensuring thatall countries within the single market made these clock changes at the same time.  Since 2001, all Member States switch to ‘summer time’ on the last Sunday of March and to switch back to their ‘winter time’ on the last Sunday of October.

Following an EU-wide public consultation to gather citizens’ views on the seasonal clock changes, the EU Commission has concluded that the majority of people who responded are in favour of abolishing the twice-yearly clock change and have put forward a proposal to give effect to this. Further details on the proposal, together with the arguments for and against changing, are available at: EU summer time arrangements - what is it about?

We are being asked if we are in favour of ending the seasonal clock changes and whether we favour staying on summer or winter time.

  • Choosing summer time means brighter evenings, with darker mornings in the winter than we currently experience.
  • Choosing winter time means brighter mornings, with darker evenings in the summer than we currently experience.

See the image or the tables below, which outline sunrise/sunset hours under each option. (Source: NOAA)

It is important to acknowledge that if the UK were to adopt a different position, this would present particular challenges for the island of Ireland. Any position adopted by Ireland will be informed by this important consideration.

Ireland must now consider what position we want to take on this proposal.

This consultation asks three important questions:

  1. Do you want to stop changing the clocks twice a year?

  2. If the clock changes stop, do you want to remain on summer time or winter time?

  3. What would your opinion be if this proposal were to give rise to different time zones between Ireland and Northern Ireland?

Individuals, businesses and organisations in Ireland and Northern Ireland can have their say by clicking on this link or emailing timeconsultation@justice.ie . The closing date for this consultation is Friday 30th November 2018.

 

Freedom of Information

It should be noted that submissions received, and reports of any further consultations undertaken with any parties in response to this request, will be subject to Freedom of Information legislation and may be published on the Department's website.

Summertime arrangements (Tabular Format)

Time of sunrise and sunset in Dublin city at four dates throughout the year under the current system of the clocks going backwards and forwards.

Current arrangements

 

Sunrise

Sunset

Day length

20-Mar

6:26

18:39

12:13

20-Jun

4 :56

21:56

17:00

20-Sep

7:07

19:27

12:20

20-Dec

8:37

16 :07

7:30

 

 

Time of sunrise and sunset in Dublin city at the same dates if we were to stay on constant ‘wintertime’ or ‘summertime’

 

 

Wintertime

Summertime

 

 

Sunrise

Sunset

Sunrise

Sunset

Day length

20 Mar

6:26

18:39

7:26

19:39

12:13

20 Jun

3:56

20 :56

4:56

21:56

17:00

20 Sep

6:07

18:27

07:07

19:27

12:20

20 Dec

8:37

16 :07

 9:37

17:07

7:30