Talks focus on Brexit and ongoing crime and security cooperation 



6 February 2017 

The Tánaiste and Minister for Justice and Equality, Frances Fitzgerald TD, met the UK Home Secretary, Amber Rudd MP, and Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, James Brokenshire MP, in London today.

The Tánaiste and the Home Secretary discussed the ongoing co-operation between Ireland and the United Kingdom on criminal justice and security issues. They also reaffirmed the commitment of the two Governments towards maintaining the Common Travel Area.

Speaking in London, the Tánaiste said:

“The Home Secretary and I reaffirmed our commitment to maintaining the Common Travel Area. We discussed its significant importance to the people of Ireland and the UK and how vital it is in the context of Northern Ireland. I welcomed the statement on reciprocal rights made by Prime Minister May during her visit to Dublin last week.

“Continuing the excellent co-operation on criminal justice and immigration issues is a key priority for Ireland and the UK will remain a key partner. Both countries are determined to ensure that criminals do not benefit in any way from the UK’s departure from the European Union.

“Ireland and the UK also enjoy excellent cooperation through the European Arrest Warrant and other EU Justice and Home Affairs legal instruments. We discussed and agreed the need for that cooperation to continue.”


The Tánaiste's visit follows the Prime Minister's recent visit to Dublin and the publication of a white paper by the UK Government.

“We very much welcome the publication of the White Paper and the specific section on Ireland/UK relations which reflects the strong ties between our two countries. Our focus remains the same: to defend and protect Ireland's interests in the negotiations and to advance our priorities, namely Northern Ireland, the Common Travel Area, the economy and the future of the EU itself.”

The Tánaiste also met the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, James Brokenshire MP. Their talks also focused on the future of the Common Travel Area, its importance in the context of the peace process and the need for all parties to re-engage in the political process in Northern Ireland.

ENDS