· The What Would You Do? Campaign is the Government’s national awareness campaign as part of the Second National Strategy on Domestic, Sexual and Gender-based violence 2016-2021
· The latest strand of the Government’s innovative public awareness raising campaign involves a simulated incident at a public place to highlight the role that witnesses can play in addressing domestic violence 
· The public is invited to share this video on social media using #mydoorsopen . The video can be viewed at the Department's Youtube page at ( https://youtu.be/hp3EPI3uegA ) . It is also available via the Department of Justice and Equality twitter account @DeptJusticeIRL.
 
 
15 September 2017
 
The Minister for Justice and Equality, Charlie Flanagan TD, and the Minister of State with special responsibility for Equality, Immigration and Integration, David Stanton TD, have joined together to support the #mydoorsopen social media campaign, as part of the national domestic violence campaign What Would You Do? which was launched in 2016.
 
Minister Flanagan said ‘ The What Would You Do? Campaign is a key part of the Government’s Second National Strategy on Domestic, Sexual and Gender based Violence which is running up to 2021. The campaign highlights the important role we as family, friends and colleagues have in helping to prevent domestic violence and in supporting those affected. I am urging members of the public to please consult whatwouldyoudo.ie for information on ways to help and links to services. '
 
As part of this thought provoking public awareness campaign last night videos were filmed in Dublin City Centre featuring two simulated on-street scenes of domestic violence, one showing abuse against a woman and one showing abuse against a man. Public reaction was captured on video to highlight the important role that third parties can play in addressing domestic violence.  A website (www.whatwouldyoudo.ie) provides information on how people can intervene to help where it is safe and legal to do so.
 
The first short video is now available online with a second to follow later today. The video can be viewed at the Department's Youtube page at ( https://youtu.be/hp3EPI3uegA ) . It is also available via the Department of Justice and Equality twitter account @DeptJusticeIRL.
 
Social media users are asked to share these videos with the #mydoorsopen to highlight and raise awareness about domestic abuse.  
 
While this simulated incident was filmed on the street, it is recognised that domestic violence often happens behind closed doors.  Friends, family, colleagues and others can play a role and the www.whatwouldyoudo.ie campaign provides importance guidance and information.
 
Speaking about the campaign Minister of State Stanton said: ‘The Government is investing €950,000 in each of the two years 2016 and 2017, along with €200,000 from the Dormant Accounts Funds, in a campaign to encourage people to be proactive about a subject that is happening behind closed doors.  Let us bring domestic violence out in the open, let us talk about it and let us show our solidarity in making Irish society a safer place for our children, families and friends #mydoorsopen.
 
 
“Domestic violence is more common than most people realise and is often unreported and misunderstood. Research suggests that in the region of 213,000 women and 88,000 men in Ireland have been severely abused by a partner at some point in their lives. Also 2 in 5 people know someone who has experienced domestic violence. '
 
Minister Flanagan concluded: ‘Domestic Violence is a pernicious evil that does not discriminate, it occurs in all social classes, genders, ethnic groups, cultures and among people of every educational background.  It is often hidden and can have devastating physical, emotional and financial consequences. It is beholden on all of us to collectively say that such evil has no place in our society and that it must stop.  People can get involved with this campaign by sharing #mydoorsopen and by visiting the website whatwouldyoudo.ie.'
 
ENDS
 
Notes for Editors
 
The What Would You Do? campaign is a 6 year Government national awareness campaign from 2016 to 2021 which aims to increase the awareness of domestic and sexual violence, to bring about a change in established behaviours and attitudes and to activate bystanders with the aim of decreasing and preventing this violence. A bystander approach to ending domestic and sexual violence is about enabling people in the community to prevent and intervene if it is safe and legal to do so.  The campaign recognises that women and men are victims of such violence.  The current campaign advertising burst runs from 28 August to 24 September 2017.
 
Statistics on domestic violence:
The findings of the National Crime Council’s National Study of Domestic Abuse by Watsons and Parsons, (2005) show that:
 
§ 15 per cent of women and 6 per cent of men have experienced severely abusive behaviour from a partner in their lifetime.
§ 29 per cent of women and 26 per cent of men suffer domestic abuse when severe abuse and minor incidents are combined.
§ In the region of 213,000 women and 88,000 men in Ireland have been severely abused by a partner at some point in their lives.
 
Cosc is the National Office for the Prevention of Domestic, Sexual and Gender-based Violence and is an executive office of the Department of Justice and Equality.  Its remit is to address domestic, sexual and gender-based violence from a cross-government perspective.
The findings of the Cosc survey of Attitudes to Domestic Abuse in Ireland by Horgan et al, (2008) show that:
 
§ Just over 70 per cent of people consider domestic abuse to be a common problem in Ireland.
§ 44 per cent of people know somebody who personally had been a victim of domestic abuse.
§ 94 per cent of people would help a friend, 65 per cent would help a stranger and 38 per cent would help a neighbour being subjected to domestic abuse.
 
The national awareness campaign is a key  action of the Government’s Second National Strategy on Domestic, Sexual and Gender-based Violence 2016-2021 and Action Plan (available at www.cosc.ie). The Strategy contains a range of actions to be implemented by State, voluntary and community sector organisations. The majority of the strategy’s actions are concerned with improving services to victims and holding perpetrators to account.