Report of the White Paper on Crime Consultation with Young People (PDF - 703KB)  This document is a pdf 

Appendices to the report on the White Paper on Crime Consultation with Young People (PDF - 250KB)  This document is a pdf 

Published April 2011

(Please note this report contains colour charts and is best viewed or printed in colour)


 

ABOUT THE WHITE PAPER PROCESS

 

A White Paper provides a high level statement of Government policy, its rationale and the strategies to give effect to that policy.  Development of the White Paper on Crime involves an end-to-end examination of the prevention, intervention and enforcement strategies to combat crime.

This is the report on a consultation session with young people on crime that was held on 10 November 2010.  More information about the White Paper on Crime process and on the outcome of public consultations to date can be found on the Department's website (www.justice.ie).

The publication of this report provides a further opportunity for organisations and members of the public to submit comments on young people's views on crime and the other topics discussed in this report.

If you wish to make a submission please send your comments to:

whitepaperoncrime@justice.ie

or

White Paper on Crime Unit,
Department of Justice and Equality,
94 St. Stephen’s Green,
Dublin 2.

Submissions on this document should be made before the end of June, 2011.

If making a submission, please state if the views expressed are personal or are being made on behalf of an organisation. If views of an organisation are being submitted, it should be made clear which organisation is represented.

Submissions may be subject to the provisions of the Freedom of Information Acts and may be published. Please indicate if you would prefer your submission to remain confidential or if you do not wish your name to be included in the list of  contributors.


Contents

 

Executive Summary & Recommendations

REPORT OF THE WHITE PAPER ON CRIME CONSULTATION WITH YOUNG PEOPLE

1. Background to the White Paper on Crime.

2. Methodology.

3. Participants.

4. Discussion Groups: Causes, Consequences and Prevention.

     A. DRUG AND ALCOHOL USE AND RELATED CRIME

     B. VANDALISM, THEFT AND DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOUR

     C. SEX CRIMES.

     D. VIOLENT AND PHYSICAL CRIME

SUMMARY OF MAIN RECOMMENDATIONS TO IMPROVE CRIME PREVENTION

APPENDICES – SCHEDULE AND EVALUATION OF CONSULTATION, FULL DATA FROM CONSULTATION 

     Appendix A - Consultation Schedule

     Appendix B - Evaluation Responses 

     Appendix C - Full lists of data gathered from flipcharts at the consultation meeting 


 

Executive Summary & Recommendations

 

White Paper on Crime Consultation with Young People, 10 November 2010

 

Aim

As part of the White Paper on Crime process, consultation with a wide range of groups is underway. The aim of this consultation session with young people was to listen to, understand and document the views of children and young people on crime in Ireland, to find out which crime related issues matter to them and how they thought Irish society should respond to crime into the future.

 

Discussion Outline

Consultation with young people is an important part of the White Paper on Crime process. The general outline for the consultation was to explore the following questions:

  1. Why does crime happen?
  2. How does crime happen?
  3. What from your experience can be done to prevent crime?
    • What have you seen that works?
    • What doesn't work?
  4. What can be done to improve things?

 

Methodology

The methodology for this event was designed in cooperation with the Communication and Participation team in the Office of the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs (OMCYA) and managed by Coexist Ltd on behalf of the Department of Justice and Law Reform.  The design took into account best practice in conducting youth consultations and the experience of the OMCYA Participation team.

Thirty-four young people participated in the event.

The views expressed in this report do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice and Law Reform or those of the Office of the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs. At several points in this report the views and suggestions of participants are recorded in the language used by the participants on the day.

 

Discussion topics

At the outset, participants identified different topics related to crime and types of crime.  A large number of topics were identified.  These were then grouped into four main categories which formed the following sub-themes for the consultation:

  1. Drug and Alcohol use and related crime
  2. Vandalism, Theft and Disruptive Behaviour
  3. Sex Crimes
  4. Violent and Physical Crimes


Vandalism, Theft and Disruptive Behavior accounted for almost half of topics suggested. 

 

Main Recommendations

As part of the consultation process the participants were asked to suggest ways to prevent crime happening under each of the categories of crime that they had identified. The most popular suggestions were:


 

Greater Levels of Law Enforcement

A high proportion of the suggestions made for dealing with all of the four categories of crimes identified could be categorised as law enforcement measures.

Law Enforcement Suggestions

Increased Garda presence and involvement in the community featured prominently. Stricter law enforcement and sentencing were also raised in many comments, although there was divided opinion about the relative merits of rehabilitative measures as opposed to punitive ones, such as curfews and stricter sentences.  Some participants felt that cautions or 'allowing underage people off with it' just encourage people to think they can get away with drug or alcohol abuse.

Crime prevention measures such as more CCTV, better lighting, confidential phone lines, warning signs where serious attacks have previously taken place, as well as personal alarms were all raised.  Stricter controls on prescription drugs and border controls were also mentioned.  For drug and alcohol abuse, a lower legal drinking age was suggested as an alternative to high risk alcohol/drug use. Urine testing in schools was discussed.

 

Greater Levels of Education

Suggestions regarding Education as a means of preventing crime were deemed most effective for sex crimes and drug and alcohol related crime.

Education Suggestions

It was recommended that education and awareness raising to prevent sex crime should include case studies and the stories behinds the statistics, as well as advice on personal safety.  This should be delivered by people who are good at interacting with young people.  Information should be presented frankly and address taboo issues which are not always out in the open.

The issue of educating boys on rape and sex crimes was discussed in detail, in particular, the participants were concerned that young women are more likely to get advice and be educated on these topics than young men.  It was felt strongly that this should be addressed and that more education on rape and sex crimes, and the impact and consequences of these crimes, is needed in boys' schools.

Suggestions were also made for more education and awareness raising in connection with drug and alcohol abuse, including asking ex-addicts to provide support and advice, buddy systems, warnings on alcohol labels, field trips to prisons, involvement of addicts in drug projects and information on the long term personal consequences of drug/alcohol abuse.

It was also suggested that people who commit offences should meet their victims, as well as older people who might be 'terrorised' by some young people's behaviour.

 

More Facilities for young people

Participants suggested more facilities for young people as a crime prevention method, most notably in order to prevent vandalism, theft and disruptive behaviour.

More Facilities

Many different types of facilities were discussed - youth cafes, full-time centres with regular activities, more free events, a national 'clean up' day, awards for community involvement, sports and opportunities to volunteer.  It was suggested that Garda involvement with youth activities would help build better relationships with young people.  Broader community-wide regeneration and social inclusion were also proposed. There were, however, differences of opinion as to whether graffiti walls worked or just generated competition amongst 'taggers'.

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Report of the White Paper on Crime Consultation with Young People, 10 November 2010

1. Background to the White Paper on Crime

 

The White Paper on Crime will be the first of its kind and is the first major official examination of the overall approach to dealing with crime since the report of the National Crime Forum (1998) and the 'Tackling Crime' discussion document (1997).

A White Paper provides a high level statement of Government policy, its rationale and the strategies to give effect to that policy.  Development of the White Paper on Crime involves an end-to-end examination of the prevention, intervention and enforcement strategies to combat crime.

Consultation has to date played a key role in the preparation of the White Paper and has taken a variety of formats, so as to achieve an extensive and inclusive range of input.  Members of the public, together with relevant public agencies and other interested bodies have had a full opportunity to contribute to the policy's formulation.  Consultations have taken place on a number of themes, such as Crime Prevention and Community Safety, Criminal Sanctions, and White Collar Crime.  Consultation seminars have taken place in a number of locations around the country and with various groups including older citizens and victims of crime.

Consultation with young people is important to this process and young people's input on this complex subject matter is crucial.  The general outline for this consultation was to have the young people identify crime and related issues that they are aware of and ask what the causes and consequences of crime are, how crime can be prevented, what prevention methods they are aware of that work or don't work, and make recommendations to improve approaches to crime prevention.

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2. Methodology

 

The methodology for this event was designed in cooperation with the Participation Team in the Office of the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs (OMCYA).  The design took into account best practice in conducting youth consultations and the experience of the OMCYA Participation Team.

The final design contained a variety of group processes and facilitation methods aimed at creating the ideal setting for young people to share their views on the complex subject matter of crime.  'Icebreaker' activities were included to enable the participants' time and space to meet each other and to introduce themselves.  The facilitation methods blended Open Space Technology[1], Buzz Groups[2], Table Mat Method[3], Pair and Share[4] and Moving Debates[5] to keep the participants engaged in the consultation from start to finish.

The consultation proceeded as follows:

Topics for discussion were not set in advance.  Using the 'Open Space' method, the participants were asked 'What types of crime are you aware of?' Participants wrote types of crime and related topics on 'Post It' notes which were then stuck to an Open Wall.  Volunteers assisted the facilitation team to group the crimes into possible headings for the discussion groups.  Following this grouping, the headings for the consultation were:

  1. Drug and Alcohol use and related crime
  2. Vandalism, Theft and Disruptive Behaviour
  3. Sex Crimes
  4. Violent and Physical Crimes


Each participant then selected one of four tables assigned to the headings above.

The first part of the discussion was facilitated using the 'Table Mat' method.  This method divides a tablecloth into equal sections for each participant to write their responses to the questions:

  1. What are the causes of this crime?
  2. What are the consequences of this crime?


This discussion was followed by a 'Moving Debate' on crime issues that asked participants to agree or disagree on the following statements:


The second part of the discussion happened after lunch and again participants choose one of the four tables representing the four headings.  This discussion used 'Buzz Groups' and 'Pair and Share' methods to answer the following questions:

  1. What have you seen to prevent crime that works? Why does this work?
  2. What have you seen to prevent crime that doesn't work? Why does it not work?
  3. What do you think can be done to reduce this type of crime?


This report has been written to group both the discussion on the causes and consequences of crime with the prevention methods and suggestions for the future.

The consultation schedule can be found in the Appendix to this report.

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3. Participants

 

The participants for this event were recruited from the Comhairle na nÓg organisations around the country, to ensure a geographical and demographic balance.  Comhairle na nÓg are local youth councils which act as a voice for young people's issues.  There are 34 local Comhairle na nÓg attached to 34 City and County Development Boards.

Young people aged 11 -18 were recruited and in total 34 young people participated in the event.

County

Number of attendees

Cavan

4

Dublin

8

Galway

2

Kerry

1

Laois

1

leitrim

1

Limerick

1

Longford

2

Louth

2

Mayo

1

Meath

2

Offaly

1

Roscommon

1

Sligo

1

Tipperary

1

Waterford

3

Westmeath

1

Wexford

1

Total

34

 
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4. Discussion Groups: Causes, Consequences and Prevention

 

 

Introduction

The discussion topics were decided using an 'Open Space' method where the participants answered the question 'What types of crime are you aware of?' on 'Post It' notes.  These 'Post Its' were then grouped into themes by volunteers and the facilitation team.  This process identified four main topics for discussion:

  1. Drug and Alcohol use and related crime
  2. Vandalism, Theft and Disruptive Behaviour
  3. Sex Crimes
  4. Violent and Physical Crimes


The findings have been grouped into themes for ease of use and a full list of responses has been included in the Appendix of this report.

 

Analysis

The young people were aware of a vast range of crimes and associated behaviours.  The discussions held on the day showed that young people are aware of criminal sanctions and there was debate between those in favour of harsher penalties such as longer sentences, and those who prefer a rehabilitative approach.

Across all the themes discussed, young people suggested that education and awareness programmes, as well as facilities for young people, would enable more effective crime prevention.

Such education and awareness programmes should not to be limited to schools.  Meeting ex-drug users and offenders on a trip to prison were suggested as part of the awareness proposals, as well as advertising campaigns and changes to labels on alcohol and cigarettes.

Overall, the participants were in favour of increased Garda presence in communities and neighbourhoods.  However, there was debate over whether Gardaí should be in uniform or not.

With regard to alcohol and drug use, some young people identified the cause of this use as being related to mental health issues such as stress and depression.  'Escapism' and 'curiosity about drugs' also featured.  A lot of discussion centred on social group influence, and the acceptance of alcohol or drug use in peer groups.

During the discussion on the causes of vandalism, theft and disruptive behaviour, the participants commented that usually these behaviours or crimes are preceded by drinking or drug use and that if more facilities and services were available to people fewer of these types of crime would occur. White Collar Crime was also identified as a serious form of theft.

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A. DRUG AND ALCOHOL USE AND RELATED CRIME

 

Brainstorming - what crimes are related to Drug and Alcohol use?

Over two thirds of total topics brainstormed were related to 'drugs', and covered issues such as the taking of drugs and drug possession, as well as drug dealing and criminal gangs.

'Underage/teenage drinking' was the second most frequently identified topic in this area.  Other topics brainstormed relating to alcohol included disorderly behaviour and fighting.

Substance abuse was identified once.

Topics Suggested

 

What are the causes of Drug and Alcohol use and related crime?

Causes of drug and acohol use and related crime 

The two major themes that arose in the discussion of the causes of drug and alcohol use and related crime were:

  1. Mental health issues
  2. Social influence/acceptance


Mental health issues accounted for a total of 41% of the causes listed.  Topics discussed included 'escapism', depression and stress.  Different types of stress were identified including:

  • Stress with parents/family
  • Stress from friends
  • Peer pressure
  • Schools/exams pressure


Some participants viewed drug and alcohol use in a positive way, mentioning 'to have fun' and 'for the laugh' as reasons for drug and alcohol use.

The acceptance of alcohol and drug use in society and peer groups was discussed by the participants.  Examples given included using alcohol or drugs 'to be sociable' and to 'fit in' with groups. The influence of friends and family was also mentioned, and reference was made to role models and acceptance in the media and rock music.

Drug addiction and drug dealing were other topics raised. 

Curiosity about drugs also featured, as did the ready availability of drugs, with one participant commenting that 'it's easier to get drugs than cigarettes'.

 

What are the consequences of Drug and Alcohol use and related crimes? 

Six main types of consequence were identified:

  1. Mental health impacts
  2. Health impacts
  3. Social consequences
  4. Criminal justice consequences
  5. Financial consequences
  6. Lack of resources

CConsequences of drug and alcohol use and related crime

Physical and mental health impacts accounted for 54% of the consequences listed, and in particular the risk of drug-related fatalities. Mental health impacts such as depression, self harm and paranoia were discussed, as were social consequences, such as loneliness and 'falling out with people'.  Criminal justice consequences were also mentioned, including going to prison and the impact of having a criminal record on future job opportunities.
 


What have you seen that works to prevent Drug and Alcohol use and related crimes? Why does it work?



 

What have you seen doesn't work to prevent Drug and Alcohol use and related crimes? Why doesn't it work?


 

Suggestions to reduce Drug and Alcohol related crime:

There was a lot of debate held around the three main themes in the suggestions section.

  1. Law Enforcement
  2. Knowledge/Awareness
  3. Facilities/Social Inclusion


Law enforcement methods comprised 57% of the overall suggestions.  There was a lot of discussion on how to get young people to support law enforcement measures to prevent these crimes occurring.


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B. VANDALISM, THEFT AND DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOUR

 

Brainstorming - what are Vandalism, Theft and Disruptive Behaviour?

CConsequences of drug and alcohol use and related crime

During the brainstorming session theft/robbery were among the most identified topics - contributing to 30% of the overall topics suggested.

Various 'white collar' crimes such as tax evasion and fraud were grouped together and accounted for the second largest theme under this heading.

 

What are the causes of Vandalism, Theft and Disruptive Behaviour?

Causes of vandalism, theft and disruptive behaviour

The most frequently identified topic in this area was 'lack of services/facilities'.  Alcohol and drug use were raised throughout the discussion around the causes of these types of crime.  The discussion around lack of services and facilities largely centred on alcohol and/ or drugs being taken before crimes are committed, and it was suggested that if more services were available less drink or drugs would be consumed and fewer of these types of crimes committed.

Topics that were raised among the family related causes included bad parenting, lack of parenting, poor role models and neglect.
 

 

What are the consequences of Vandalism, Theft and Disruptive Behaviour?

During this discussion consequences of different types of crime were listed individually and then grouped into 4 main themes:

  1. Consequence for the Individual or Community
  2. Vandalism
  3. Theft
  4. Disruptive Behaviour


Most of the consequences suggested were concerned with the individual or community.  Consequences for the individual included criminal record, bad relationships between children, more involvement in crime.  With regard to the impact on the community consequences discussed included 'ugly' neighbourhoods (due to vandalism), impact on house prices, as well as fear in community and elderly people feeling afraid.

There was division and a lot of debate within the group during this session.  Some young people felt that stricter measures were needed, whereas others were in favour of rehabilitative measures.  This debate around law enforcement and rehabilitation continued into the 'What works?' section.

 

Prevention of Vandalism, Theft and Disruptive Behaviour - What works? Why?

Preventing vandalism, theft and disruptive behaviour

Law enforcement methods accounted for just under half of the topics identified.  During the discussion there was division between those who favoured stricter penalties and those who favoured rehabilitation.

Again the theme of facilities played a big part in the discussion. More youth cafés, youth centres, graffiti walls, better lighting and regular activities were the main suggestions in this area.

 

Prevention of Vandalism, Theft and Disruptive Behaviour - What doesn't work? Why?

The group identified 11 current measures they felt don't work, 5 of which related to prison factors.

The topics identified are listed in the table below:

  • Graffiti walls - create competition    
  • Consulting/awareness for set groups - needs to be for all 
  • Prison sentences for petty crimes    
  • Not having rehab in prison     
  • Prison is not strict enough     
  • Media glamorising crimes     
  • Some Garda attitudes - abuse of powers   
  • Too much freedom in prescription drugs which are sold, can also lead to dependence    
  • Prescriptions need to be reduced    
  • Borders not tight enough - need to be strengthened
    (avoid smuggling)

  

 

Suggestions to prevent Vandalism, Theft and Disruptive Behaviour

Suggestions to prevent vandalism, theft and disruptive behaviour

Law enforcement and facilities were the 2 main themes in this discussion, accounting for 41% and 38% respectively of the suggestions listed.  The participants were particularly interested in Garda presence in neighbourhoods and in Gardaí becoming involved in the community and improving their relationship with young people.

Other suggestions included increasing undercover Gardaí and checkpoints, skate parks with graffiti walls, more effort being put into rehabilitation, education & awareness programmes, access to volunteering and rewards for community work.

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C. SEX CRIMES

 

Brainstorming - what is Sex Crimes?

Among the types of sex crimes identified 'rape' was the most frequently identified, and accounted for 44% of issues mentioned, 'child abuse' was the second most identified topic at 12% and 'underage sex' and 'prostitution' ranked 9% and 7% respectively.

Human trafficking and prostitution / trafficking were also mentioned.

 

What causes Sex Crimes?

Some of the reasons behind sex crime identified included mental problems, family issues, the culprit being a victim themselves, past experiences including childhood experiences, lack of protocol for those with access to kids, lack of education, power or self esteem issues, and culture.

 

What are the consequences of Sex Crimes?

There was a lot of discussion on this topic among the group.  The group agreed that the single biggest consequence of sex crimes is the emotional impact - with 'emotional effects' accounting for 24% of all consequences.  It should be noted 'emotional effects' arose during the discussions about other types of consequences; however the group felt strongly that 'emotional effects' should be recognised as the biggest consequence in its own right.

Another area that was discussed in depth was education on rape and sex crimes in schools.  The group felt strongly that there is a need for more education on this topic in boys' schools.  The group commented that in cases of rape or sex crime the offender is far more likely to be male yet there is little or no education on rape and sex crimes, and the impact and consequences of these crimes, in boys schools.  Girls are far more likely to receive education on these matters in school.  The group felt strongly that this should be addressed and that boys should receive this education in schools.  In discussing the consequences of rape and sex crimes, participants also noted that the impact of male rape on men and boys is as serious as the impact of rape on women and girls.

The second most mentioned consequence was 'child abuse', which accounted for 20% of the overall consequences listed.


What have you seen that works to prevent sex crimes? Why does it work?

 

What doesn't work? Why?



Suggestions to improve prevention of Sex Crimes

There were 4 main themes in the suggestions:

  1. Law enforcement measures
  2. Education
  3. Facilities
  4. Economic measures

suggestions to improve prevention of sex crimes

Law enforcement measures were the most frequently mentioned suggestions accounting for 46% of all suggestions.  There was a lot of discussion around CCTV and it was suggested that Garda presence should be increased and stronger penalties applied when crimes have been committed.  Services such as emergency button/support lines also played a big part in the discussion.

There was a lot of debate around signs in public places warning of personal danger, such as accident black spots, and the young people suggested this sign:

Warning, Personal Danger!

Education and awareness campaigns about the after-effects and recovery from sex crimes accounted for 42% of suggestions.


Other suggestions:


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D. VIOLENT AND PHYSICAL CRIME

 
 
 
Brainstorming - what is Violent and Physical Crime 

topics suggested - violent and physical crime

Murder was the most frequently mentioned topic in this area at 51% and included 'homicide', 'killing', and 'stabbings'.  The next most familiar topic to the participants was other types of physical violence.


What are the causes of Violent and Physical Crime?

Causes of violent and physical crime 

There were 4 main themes identified in this session:

Emotional causes - these included issues such as jealousy, dealing with death, attention seeking - and accounted for 18% of the overall suggestions.

Bullying/Racism - also accounted for 18% of the suggestions listed.

Lack of facilities - the causes identified under this theme related to people having 'no release' and 'venting pent up anger'.

Past experiences - these were causes relating to abusive childhoods and relationships and were grouped separately.

What are the consequences of Violent and Physical Crime?

Consequences of violent and physical crime 

The impact on family and community was the most frequently identified consequence.

Other suggestions are detailed below:

 

Prevention of Violent and Physical Crime - what works? Why?

40% of the topics discussed related to facilities and education each and 20% related to law enforcement measures.


 

What doesn't work to prevent Violent and Physical Crime?

The topics discussed in this session related to law enforcement measures.

Suggestions to improve prevention of Violent and Physical Crime:

The suggestions made during this exercise fall into 3 categories:

  1. Law enforcement - 50%
  2. Peer education - 33%
  3. Education - 17%


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SUMMARY OF MAIN RECOMMENDATIONS TO IMPROVE CRIME PREVENTION

 

This section contains the main recommendations from the discussion groups with suggestions for what the young people would like to see happen in the future to help prevent crime.

The three main themes running through the recommendations were:

  1. Law Enforcement
  2. Education
  3. Facilities

 

Law Enforcement

Across all four headings the most frequently made suggestions were on the theme of law enforcement.  Recommendations made included stricter penalties and as well as rehabilitative measures.

Law Enforcement Suggestions

There were two main topics that came up most frequently among the 'law enforcement' suggestions: increasing Garda presence and community involvement, and stricter sanctions.  Also discussed were increasing the use of CCTV and the value of rehabilitative methods

Increase in Garda presence and community involvement accounted for 17% of the overall suggestions for preventing crime.  In particular, there were more of these types of suggestions in the sex crimes and drugs and alcohol sections.  There was also discussion around whether Gardaí should be in uniform or not.

On the day there was a lot of debate around the following suggestions:


The types of suggestions around Garda presence and community involvement included more Garda checkpoints, more Garda presence in neighbourhoods, whether this presence should be undercover or in uniform and increasing Garda presence during the day as well as at night. 

It was suggested that Gardaí should be involved in local clubs like GAA and soccer clubs to build relationships with young people, and that Gardaí should work with schools to address fighting.

With regard to sex crimes, it was suggested there should be more investigations of sex crimes and these types of crime should be taken seriously at all times.

Participants discussed CCTV and suggested it should be used in secluded areas and lanes, backed up with public lighting and signs warning of personal danger.  More lighting around popular drinking and crime-related areas was also proposed.  Emergency buttons disguised as jewellery and emergency phone numbers for alerting Gardaí or parents were also discussed.

Suggestions relating to penalties were generally in favour of stricter sanctions however there was debate around the need for more rehabilitative methods.  Suggestions included longer sentences with counselling for offenders during the sentence, stricter laws and educating young people on consequences of crime.  Another suggestion was to have young people meet the homeowners or older people they are 'terrorising'.

The participants also discussed border controls in relation to human trafficking as well as Garda clearance for persons working with children.


 

Education

Education Suggestions

Education and lack of education were the subject of a lot of discussions and debate, with participants suggesting educating on crime and alcohol and drugs from an early age.  Furthering education and awareness through SPHE (Social, Personal and Health Education) and CSPE (Civic, Social and Personal Education) classes as well as educating young people on the dangers of joyriding before being allowed to drive were proposed.  Peer education to teach the effects of crimes and change social attitudes and role models were discussed.

The young people gave particular attention to education and awareness campaigns in the discussions on sex crimes and drugs and alcohol.

In the sex crimes discussion the suggestions were around improving the awareness of the effects of sex crimes as well as improving personal safety (self defence resources for men and women were suggested).  In school, it was suggested that the school counsellor should be an outsider rather than a teacher, that education be provided on the impact of sex crimes on the life of the victim, showing the person behind the statistics and their story.

Awareness campaigns such as ad campaigns and 'Movember' style campaigns were discussed. There was concern that the subject of sex crimes should not be ignored, 'people need to know what's out there if it keeps going ignored it will continue to happen'.  There was also a lot of discussion around the lack of education on rape and sex in boys' schools.

In the drugs and alcohol discussions the suggestions were related to education on the effects of drug and alcohol use, meetings with ex-addicts, as well as school visits to prisons.


 

Facilities

More Facilities

Facilities - or lack of, were another big theme among the suggestions across three of the four headings.  In the discussions around -Vandalism, Theft and Disruptive Behaviour-, 'more facilities' was the most popular suggestion to prevent these types of crime.

The young people recommended more youth cafes and youth centres that are open full time, as well as sporting events and cheaper tickets for music and sporting events.  Skate parks with graffiti walls were suggested, and there was discussion around whether graffiti walls can help prevent 'tagging' or whether they just make people more competitive.  Activities that all young people can become involved in, as well as day trips for young people were proposed.  Volunteering was also discussed and proposals in this area included that there should be more opportunities to volunteer, rewards for volunteering, fundraising for charities and a national cleaning day for communities.

Facilities and services for the victims of sex crimes were also discussed and the participants said that victims of sex crimes should be made aware that there is help available for them.  They suggested more volunteers and funding are needed, and that services should be free and readily available.  Facilities for psychological help were also proposed.

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APPENDICES - SCHEDULE AND EVALUATION OF CONSULTATION, FULL DATA FROM CONSULTATION

 

 

Appendix A - Consultation Schedule

 

White Paper on Crime Consultation with young people, 10 November 2010

11:30 a.m. Arrival and registration
11.40 a.m. Welcome and Introduction to White Paper on Crime process
11.50 a.m. Brainstorm on 'What is Crime?'
12.00 p.m. Ice Breaking and Energiser Activities
12.15 p.m.

First Discussions 
What are the Causes and Consequences of Crime?

12.55 p.m.

Moving Debate on Crime Issues

1.00 p.m.

Lunch

2.15 p.m

Second Discussions
What can be done to prevent Crime?
3.15 p.m. Summary feedback by young people
3.20 p.m. Final Comments from White Paper on Crime Unit
3.25 p.m. Evaluation
3.30 p.m. Conference Close

 

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Appendix B - Evaluation Responses

Participants were issued with an evaluation form at the end of the day, and 31 were returned from a total 34 participants.

 

What was the Consultation about?

The responses to this question show that the participants had a good grasp of what the event was about.

 

Do you think it was an appropriate way for consulting with young people?

The methods used were received very well with young people commenting that they had ample opportunity to have their views heard and they felt they were treated as adults.

 

Please rate the following 1 being poor and 5 being brilliant.

Accumulated Response
Venue 1(0) 2(0) 3(1) 4(9) 5(21)
Facilitators 1(0) 2(0) 3(0) 4(6) 5(25)
Discussions 1(0) 2(0) 3(2) 4(7) 5(22)
Moving Debates 1(0) 2(2) 3(9) 4(11) 5(9)
Food 1(1) 2(0) 3(8) 4(16) 5(6)
General Organisation 1(0) 2(0) 3(1) 4(11) 5(19)

These responses indicate that the participants were very happy with the consultation in general.  The response to the 'Moving Debate' was mixed.  In most categories two thirds of participants scored the event 4 or more.

 

What else do you think you gained from the event?

 

Any other comments or suggestions

The venue was hard to get to transport wise
Brill Day
Brilliant facilitators
Fantastic Day
 


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Appendix C - Full lists of data gathered from flipcharts at the consultation meeting

 

Drug and Alcohol use and related crime

Brainstorming - what are Drug and Alcohol use and related crime?

40 topics were suggested in this area.


 


What causes Drug and Alcohol use and related crime?

There were 67 causes listed in total.


 

What are the consequences of Drug and Alcohol use and related crime?

There were 91 consequences listed.

Suggestions to reduce Drug and Alcohol related crime

There were 44 suggestions made.


 

Vandalism, Theft and Disruptive Behaviour

Brainstorming - what are theft, vandalism and disruptive behaviour?

108 topics were listed in total.

What are the causes of Crime related to Vandalism, Theft and Disruptive Behaviour?

There were 57 causes listed.

 

What are the consequences of Vandalism, Theft and Disruptive Behaviour?

Vandalism – 12 in total 


 

 

Theft - 8 in total


 

 

Disruptive Behaviour - 8 in total


 

 

Individual/Community Impact – 20 in total 


 


 

 

Prevention of Vandalism, Theft and Disruptive Behaviour - What works? Why?

35 topics identified in total.


 

Prevention of Vandalism, Theft and Disruptive Behaviour - What doesn't work? Why?

11 prevention methods were mentioned in total.


 

Suggestions to prevent Vandalism, Theft and Disruptive Behaviour

There were 38 Suggestions.

 

Sex Crimes

Brainstorming - what is Sex crime?

There were 43 topics mentioned in total.


 

What are the causes of different types of Sex Crimes?

Child abuse

 

Human Trafficking/Prostitution 


 

Rape


 

 

Underage Sex


 

 

Public Indecency

 

Sexual Harassment


What are the consequences of Sex crimes?

Emotional Effects


 

 

Rape

 

Child Abuse


 

 

Pregnancy


 

Human Trafficking/Prostitution

 

Underage Sex


 

Sexual Harassment


 

Prostitution 

 

Prevention - what have you seen that works to prevent Sex Crime? And why does it work?


 

What doesn't work? Why?

 

Suggestions to improve prevention of Sex Crimes


 

 

Violent and Physical Crime

Brainstorming - what is Violent and Physical Crime?

45 topics listed in total


 

What causes violent and physical crime?

There were 61 causes listed.

 

What are the consequences of violent and physical crime?

There were 45 consequences identified.

 

Prevention of Violent and Physical Crime - what works? Why?

10 suggestions made:

 

What doesn't work to prevent Violent and Physical Crime?

10 measures were suggested.

 

Suggestions to improve prevention of Violent and Physical Crime:

There were 12 suggestions made.

 

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[1] OpenSpace Technology is a consultation method that allows participants to determine the topics for discussion themselves through the use of 'Post It' notes.

[2] Buzz Groups method uses a small group, consisting of three to six people who are given an assignment to complete in a short time period before reporting back to a larger group.

[3] Table Mat method divides a tablecloth into equal sections for each participant to write their responses to the question.

[4] Pair and Share gives participants time to think of an answer to a question which they then share with a partner and compare, discuss and report back to the group.

[5] Moving Debates are debates where a statement is made by the facilitator and participants move into groups for 'Agree', 'Disagree' or 'Undecided'. Members of each group are then asked to explain their reasons and attempt to persuade other participants to change their opinion and move to a different group.